Seven top tips for Freelancer Success


Lionel Bunting shares with us his seven top tips for freelancer success.

From understanding your audience to pricing correctly and communicating, they all seem perfectly sensible. But how many of them did we follow?

Hmmm… truth now…

Seven Top Tips For Winning More Freelance Business

 1) Understand your target audience and what their needs and requirements are; getting business savvy is essential and businesses will expect this of you and of course greater commercial awareness and understanding will help you win more work and make more money!

2) Confidence is a key element of winning work. New freelancers joining the market because of their employer going bump often don’t know where to start, even seasoned freelancers struggle, but be confident in your skills and abilities especially if you have a good track record and portfolio to support you. People buy into confident people.

3) Price and pitch yourself correctly – find out what others are charging and how they are pitching themselves to companies (agencies can help with this) dress smartly, if you’re a creative you can’t always get away with jeans! This may be a stop gap career move for you but people do this as a career choice so don’t damage the market by storming in and vastly undercutting prices and in turn devaluing the service sector.

4) Set out your working terms and conditions and your payment terms so these are clear and work with the clients requirements and service level agreement Its generally bad practice to compete on price alone as price usually indicates an experiential or seniority level in work, skills and standards but confusing this is not going to help anyone; so use terms and conditions and service agreements to set out the real benefits to potential clients.

5) Do communicate with clients. Keep in contact with your client even if there’s no real update; it helps to foster good working relations. If you are often on the phone or in meetings, let your clients know that you cannot always take calls but will return them as soon as possible. If they know how you work they are less likely to stress and worry about your work and delivering.

6) Deliver what you say you will deliver, on time and within budget – being late and whacking in a big invoice afterwards is not going to win you more work. If you have set out a service level agreement you should also have agreed timescales and progress points for your project so stick to these, after all you set them!

7) The client is not always right; don’t be a yes man! Do remember that if you are contracted to provide a service or solution, that you are (or should be) the right person for the job and have more knowledge than the client on this. Do not be afraid to tell them if you think you have a better angle or approach to the task at hand, and give your opinion and experience; after all that’s what they hired you to do.

by Lionel Bunting

Lionel has been running his own marketing, PR and design business since 2001 and currently undergoing a rebrand. Lionel has worked with, and for, many leading companies and rising stars across the UK and indeed Europe developing and implementing effective marketing strategies and creative promotional campaigns are the core activities he is involved in, for the company and indeed for his client base, specialising in leisure, retail and lifestyle businesses.

A leading figure in the northwest, Lionel has presented at conferences, developed international education programmes as well as creating and presenting academic resources and workshops on enterprise, entrepreneurship, business planning and marketing. His educational special interest areas are sports, fashion and the creative sector.

www.citruscitrus.co.uk

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Written by Editor on October 4, 2010 and filed in Featured, Freelance Jobs, Freelancers, Opinion , , , ,


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